Grateful 49

How true the old adage is – you never really appreciate anything until it’s gone. So much is taken for granted and it’s only when something goes wrong that we fully realise how lucky and blessed we actually are.

Shortly before Christmas I discovered that I had a BRVO – a branch retinal vein occlusion – in my right eye (my good eye). The world became cloudy and every time I cried at a Christmas movie, I half expected to find blood pouring down my face. The photographs are amazing – modern medicine is amazing. It is amazing how far we have come and also how far we have yet to go. None of the doctors/specialists I’ve seen can tell me why it happened. The cause remains a mystery. Nor can they tell me if it is likely to happen again.

My vision acuity is 125%. I can see what I focus on – but everything around it is blurred. Reading text is like being followed by a moving wave… and the scary thing is that I’m getting used to it. The treatment is new – legalised last year – an IV injection of something that costs in the region of €1000 per ml. My specialist is reluctant to give it to me as technically I can see very well. Most frustrating but then, at that price, perhaps I’m just as well off.

I need to wait about two months and hope that the blood is reabsorbed into my system and the bruising disappears. It could take as long as a year. My initial fear on diagnosis gave way to irritation and frustration at seeing the world through a foggy lens, and is now settling down to the stark realisation that I have little other choice but to adapt. And it could be a lot worse – at least I can still see. On the days that it doesn’t bother me as much, I have a new appreciation for my sight. And on the days when I can’t see very well at all, I have a new appreciation for my sight.

This week, out of all the things I’m grateful for, I’m grateful that I can still see.

Subscribe to get notified when I publish something new.

7 Responses

  1. I’m with you on this one – I’ve had the occasional unexplained release of blood into an eye, and it can be quite frightening. Mine has always obviously been very minor and has cleared up within hours, but the uncertainty of whether it would or not was always present. And there’s nothing worse, so to speak, than an itch you can’t scratch – and in this case, that’s the last thing you should attempt! Hope your eye is better very soon indeed.

  2. I’ve said this before and love saying it every day. I’m grateful you are my friend!!!

    Will pray for recovery and non-reoccurance (how’s that for a word? and spelling?) Tell me, how much is C (with the lines in it) 1000 per ml. in a way I can understand. Have patience with me, dear Mary:)

    I have been having changes in my vision also. ARMD and cataracts and now a new change is happening. Retina specialist on regular basis. Getting old is a challenge but it still beats the alternative:) Love you, Donna

Talk to me...

%d bloggers like this:

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information on cookies and GDPR

Cookies and GDPR Compliance

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

General Data Protection Regulation

If you have voluntarily submitted your email address so that you can receive notifications of new posts, please be assured that I don't use your address for anything other than to do just that - and that's done automatically. I might use your address, if I knew how to, but I don't.

This blog does not make money, it does not carry sponsored content, it has no ads for which I receive any form of payment. If I review a place or a restaurant or a book, I don't receive any compensation from anyone. I wish I did, but that would require marketing myself and life is too short. If something changes, I will be sure to let you know.

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe or manage subscription links at the bottom of every email you receive. When you comment on a blog post, Google Analytics tracks where you're posting from. This is stored and I can check my stats to see how many clicks I had today, where people clicked from, and what they clicked on. That's it. Nothing more.

I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive, particularly to other commenters. If you want to have one of your comments deleted, the please get in touch with me at: mary@irjjol.com. I'm all for the right to be forgotten so will happily oblige.

So, in a nutshell, if you give me your email address voluntarily to subscribe to new posts or if you opt to subscribe to new comments, then you email is just used for this. Nothing else. Promise.

Close