Fast-forward 35 years

I missed my 30-year school reunion. I was in Israel at the time. It was so successful that there was another one a year or so later. I got to that one and caught up with people I hadn’t seen in years. I remember a collective wondering at where the time had gone. American TV school reunions fascinate me, as do the High School yearbooks, where people are voted most likely to succeed, most likely to become millionaires, most likely to grow bunions. They’re the go-to resource when it comes to solving murders in TV whodunnits. Ireland is way more casual  – we didn’t get any further than the simple autograph book. And as we collected witty (and not-so-witty) rhymes from our soon-to-be-former classmates, I don’t think any of us stopped to wonder who among us would be famous – some day, even if one of our own, Murray Boland [now BAFTA-Award-winning executive producer in the UK] had made an appearance on the Late Late Toy Show while we were still in school – and that was like, Wow! Totes amaze.

I was in Edinburgh visiting one of my many cousins a quare few years ago, when I saw an episode of MacIntyre Investigates and realised that said same Donal MacIntyre had been in my class at school. Mad! I was a little in awe, reading his Wikipedia page. Who’d have thunk it. I never would have figured him for the type to get beaten up in bars and have to go on the lam when the thugs and gurriers he was investigating came looking for their ounce of flesh.

I was suitably impressed by Mick O’Toole’s photography and his ad campaigns. One of his most impressive photos is that of a man washing his face in the sea. Stunning. And staying with the sea, his short film on wave energy for Maynooth University has some jawdropping imagery. There’s a lotta talent lurking there, and I don’t ever remember him with a camera.

More recently though, another classmate came to light. Katrina Costello (although I could have sworn she went by Caitriona … she probably changed it to make it easier for the international brigade) is now a cinematographer/director whose documentary The Silver Branch was up for an award at the IFTA this year. And while I wouldn’t have the bladder control needed to live Donal’s life, reading about what Caitriona has been up to had me green with envy.

I contracted on mostly six months on, six months off periods — working in some of the major stock exchanges and banking capitals of the world,” she explains. “That allowed me the opportunity to do what I love; to go alone photographing and living in the far-off reaches of the world — from the mountains of Asia to the basin of the Amazon.

My ability with a camera wouldn’t even touch the shadow of the foot of a tripod in comparison to Mike or Caitriona, I have zero interest in being in or on TV like Murray. But a six-month on/six-month off schedule? And the wherewithal to travel? That I could do.

When I got over the envy and watched the trailer for her documentary, I was gobsmacked. It’s beautiful. Simply beautiful. I’ve been quoting it since. And it’s featured in the Fléadh in Galway later this year (Friday, 14th July) but I’ll be wedding it up that night somewhere in Portugal. I need to figure out another way to see the full thing.

The Silver Branch is a philosophical vision-poem on the life of farmer/poet Patrick McCormack, descendant of the generations of farmers who have lived off the wild landscape of the Burren in County Clare. Patrick and his rural community are drawn into a divisive battle with the Government, leading him and a small group of friends to the Supreme Court to decide on the fate of this iconic wilderness. Through Patrick’s eyes, and in his words, this beautifully shot film immerses us in the exquisite texture of the natural world, bringing us a rare glimpse of a disappearing way of life with all its richness and roguery, and leading to a deep connection with the Earth and our ancestral wild spirit. And though it is centred around [sic] one man’s life and a bitter-sweet end-of-era evocation, it explores much deeper themes: the relationship between man and landscape, between tradition and spirit, between body and soul. The Silver Branch is a story of hope – hope that we as individuals can make a difference to our universe.

My favourite line from the trailer is that everyone needs time and space and have a favourite place to come and see and visit and listen and be at peace. I have that. I’m lucky.

I’m sure many of the 70 or so who were in the Class of 1983 have done wild and wonderful things with their lives. That their fame has escaped me has probably lots to do with my paltry presence and engagement with social media, and little to do with the ineffectiveness of the village grapevine. I’m simply not in the know. It is nice, though, to see what 35 years can do to a life, and to take a tangential pride in the success of those you once sat beside in school. Note to self: Search for that autograph book. Some of those signatures could be worth money 🙂

 

Subscribe to get notified when I publish something new.

One Response

  1. I loved the trailer on the Silver Branch, i will sure look for the film. It’s beautiful but terribly sad, it’s what is going on around us, every day, in on my small island. Worse thing is …. there is no going back to what we are doing, i think they call it ‘progress’.

Talk to me...

%d bloggers like this:

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information on cookies and GDPR

Cookies and GDPR Compliance

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

General Data Protection Regulation

If you have voluntarily submitted your email address so that you can receive notifications of new posts, please be assured that I don't use your address for anything other than to do just that - and that's done automatically. I might use your address, if I knew how to, but I don't.

This blog does not make money, it does not carry sponsored content, it has no ads for which I receive any form of payment. If I review a place or a restaurant or a book, I don't receive any compensation from anyone. I wish I did, but that would require marketing myself and life is too short. If something changes, I will be sure to let you know.

You can unsubscribe at any time by clicking the unsubscribe or manage subscription links at the bottom of every email you receive. When you comment on a blog post, Google Analytics tracks where you're posting from. This is stored and I can check my stats to see how many clicks I had today, where people clicked from, and what they clicked on. That's it. Nothing more.

I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive, particularly to other commenters. If you want to have one of your comments deleted, the please get in touch with me at: mary@irjjol.com. I'm all for the right to be forgotten so will happily oblige.

So, in a nutshell, if you give me your email address voluntarily to subscribe to new posts or if you opt to subscribe to new comments, then you email is just used for this. Nothing else. Promise.

Close