Grateful 17

I’m beside myself this week at what has happened with the Armenia/Azerbaijan/Hungary fiasco. For those of you who haven’t been following it, let me give my rather simple synopsis. Azeri kills Armenian in Hungary with an axe. Azeri tried and sentence to life imprisonment. After some years served, Hungary ships Azeri back to Baku on the understanding that he will serve at least 25 years before being paroled. Instead, he is given a hero’s welcome, eight years back pay, a new flat, and a promotion – all for killing an Armenian.

In the meantime, the Hungarian government, having failed to secure funding from China and Saudi Arabia, and not wanting to be any more indebted to the IMF or the EU, is considering a bond buy from Azerbaijan to the tune of 2-3 billion euro. Coincidence? Perhaps.

I visited Baku last year around the anniversary of the 1992 massacre and was horrified to find that school kids are being taught, in school and at home, to hate Armenians. They write essays about growing up and killing Armenians. What hope do both countries have of ever settling their differences if this is the legacy that’s being handed down generation after generation.

I don’t for a minute profess to fully understand the situation. I’m eons away from being able to talk about it with any degree of insight. But surely there comes a time when we need to move on. This is not about the past – and I don’t know enough to take sides anyway. This is right now. I can’t for the life of me see how any government, in this day and age, could so publicly reward a cold-blooded murderer and still expect to participate in global politics and policy-making.

The Internet Governance Forum is scheduled for Baku in November this year. Apparently Armenia will follow remotely but will not come to Baku for the proceedings. I’m wondering how many other countries will do the same?

This week, I’m really grateful that I can still get upset about what is going on around me. I’m grateful that I can still recognise an injustice when I see one. And I’m particularly grateful that I’m not one of the apathetic masses,  divorced  from what is happening in the world to the point that voting in elections has become an inconvenience and protesting a wrong has become someone else’s job.

Note: For a reminder of what the Grateful series is about, check out Grateful 52

1 reply
  1. Bernard Adams
    Bernard Adams says:

    This all arises from the continued existence of the Armenian enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh inside Azerbaijan, a First World War product. How, in days of yore, the Armenian population got into such a silly place I don’t know.

    Reply

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